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Pencaitland

Easter Pencaitland

Title: Easter Pencaitland
Reviewed by Admin on Jul 2
Rating: 3.5

In 1635, certain lands in Easter Pencaitland were confirmed by King James to James Livingston (Jacobo Levingstoun).

In 1636, certain lands were granted to Sir James McGill, and in the same year lands of “Eister et Wester Tempilhall” are granted to John Pringle, W.S. (M. Joanni Pringill).

In 1638, a large grant of lands is given to Joanni Sinclair, included areas of land in Wester Pencaitland.  It also included land belonging to the Lairds of Hirdmestoun.

In 1641, some lands in Easter Pencaitland were granted by the King to Patrick Hepburn and in the same year, other lands to James Hamilton.

The next year lands of Easter Pencaitland are confirmed by the King to Sir James McGill, which lands seemed to have been Glebe land, with meadow; though the house and garden were reserved for the use of vicars.

The above are excerpts from the Register of Great Seal (1634-1651AD)

Almost immediately before the bridge between Wester and Easter Pencaitland, directly to the right is the avenue and drive towards Tyneholme House, which was the residence of Mr James Reid JP, proprietor of the lands of Wester Pencaitland and the owner of Woodhall Colliery.  Tyneholme then spent time as Barnardo Boy’s home.  Up until recently the home, was a residential retirement facility.

Adjacent to Tyneholme is the manse, the manse garden and then the church.  The manse is a commodious well-built house facing south, situated close to the churchyard but on a lower level.  The garden continues farther south towards the Tyne and is over an acre in size.

The church is a venerable picturesque structure and is one of the oldest remembrances of the village.  It stands within the churchyard having both the chancel and the nave under one roof.  It is still used as a place of worship under the Christian Church of Scotland and has a long and honorable history.

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